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Tiffany Woys Channels Shania Twain, Faith Hill and Taylor Swift in Sassy New Video for “Do Ya” (Watch)

The newcomer sits down with CS Country to learn more about the song and what’s to come from upcoming music.

Photo Credit: Robert Chavers

Tiffany Woys is back and turning heads in the music video for her latest single “Do Ya!”

The fun and flirty song that’s currently spinning on Country radio finally has a visual to go along with it, and it shows Woys taking on the personas and iconic looks of some of the most powerful women in Country music.

Directed by Robert Chavers and filmed in Nashville, the California native channels her biggest influences like Shania Twain, Faith Hill and Taylor Swift in the clever clip. She tells CS Country that she was “so excited” to pay tribute to her favs and while opening up about how the video’s concept came about.

“I wasn’t nervous, I was just really excited,” Woys says regarding the visual’s concept. “The idea came to me after I released the song because I was getting a lot of feedback from people saying the song felt very nostalgic like a late nineties, early millennial, country song.”

“This was the first time I didn’t really have a concept in my brain about what I wanted to do for a music video, which is very stressful for me to not have that idea already, so when people were telling me that time and time again, it clicked and I was like, ‘that’s exactly what I’m going to do then. I’m not going to try to tell the story of the song, I’m going to pay tribute and homage to the people that feel nostalgic for females in country music.’”

Courtesy of Tiffany Woys

CS Country sits down with Tiffany (virtually) to chat all about the music video for “Do Ya,” her latest duet with Jordan Fletcher, as well as her upcoming EP, which she says shows how much she’s grown and matured as an artist this past year.

Take a read at the full Q&A below and don’t forget to let us know what you think of “Do Ya” by either leaving a reaction at the bottom of the post or by sending us a tweet at @CS_Country. You can also connect with Tiffany by following her on Instagram at @tiffanywoys.

Celeb Secrets Country: In the music video for your new single “Do Ya” you pay homage to some the biggest names in music like Shania Twain, Faith Hill, and Taylor Swift. Did you feel nervous at all trying to imitate such iconic figures? 

Tiffany Woys: “I wasn’t nervous, I was just really excited. The only thing with Shania Twain is that I know she embodies so much sex appeal and I didn’t necessarily want to do that with mine, which is why I kept the jacket on — not because it’s not incredible what she did, but just because the Taylor Swift and Faith Hill sides are so playful and fun and kind of juvenile in a sense, I didn’t want to throw it off too much by throwing in this whole sexy scene. I kind of wanted to keep it all the same vibe throughout the whole thing. The idea came to me after I released the song because I was getting a lot of feedback from people saying the song felt very nostalgic like a late nineties, early millennial, country song. This was the first time I didn’t really have a concept in my brain about what I wanted to do for a music video, which is very stressful for me to not have that idea already, so when people were telling me that time and time again, it clicked and I was like, ‘That’s exactly what I’m going to do then. I’m not going to try to tell the story of the song, I’m going to pay tribute and homage to the people that feel nostalgic for females in country music.’”

CSC: Did you write the song? 

TW: “I did not. My favorite writer in town is hands down Sara Haze. I’ve actually cut numerous songs of hers at this point — she probably thinks I’m wildly obsessed with her which isn’t the case — but a lot of artists will say they have a writer in town that kind of gets them and their sound. What’s so funny about the whole thing is Sara [Haze] and I have never met. I’ve been cutting her songs for over three years and I’m like, ‘I need to meet this girl.’ It’s weird that she knows me without knowing me. I’ve been pitched songs for five years now and I’ve never found someone who just helped me find my sound and my lane here in Nashville. Hearing her stuff, I think I listened to her whole catalog at this point, and there isn’t anything that I don’t like. But I just know after awhile she’s going to be like, ‘Does anybody else cut my music other than this Tiffany chick?'”

CSC: It’s always crazy when you hear or read someone else’s lyrics and it describes you and tells your story perfectly. 

TW: “That’s kind of just been my angle here in Nashville thus far. I just see this as a collaborative effort and I’ve always been that way. I’m more so on the angle of wanting to cut outside cuts because at the end of the day I’m only cutting things that tell my story as well. A writer’s story becomes an artist’s story becomes a listener’s story. I’m sure there are so many song you’ve heard where you’re like, ‘Oh my gosh that tells my life and story.’ And that’s our job as an artist to connect with people without them even knowing you.” 

Photo Credit: Robert Chavers

CSC: Since you enjoy cutting outside songs, who are some other writers you enjoy working with?

TW: “Really it’s all over the map. [Sara] is just the one that I keep on coming back to every time. And that’s what makes it fate or destined because a lot of the time, I won’t even look at the writer. I can just tell [it’s Sara’s] at that point because she has such a distinct style that not many other females in country are doing as a writer. It’s what I was wanting to do coming in here but I never landed on it. And everyone was like, ‘well you just need to start writing all of your own music. Because if that isn’t out there…’ and I was like, ‘no I get it.’

I’m such a stickler on wanting to put out the best of the best just for not just for me, but for people who are listening. I also really want to succeed with other people in town. I don’t want this to be a solo thing, so I love taking outside cuts because at the end of the day, a lot of these writers don’t want to be artists, so how do they get their music heard if artists like me aren’t cutting them?

I’ve just taken it upon myself to be that artist in a sense and I love doing it. I will never cut something that doesn’t tell me and my story. That’s the cool part about it — a writer can have a reason in their head why they went into the writing room and wrote that, and then I have a reason for why I want to cut it, and how our stories are probably way more similar than anybody imagined, and that’s just like a listener to an artist. You probably have something in common with your favorite artist and you don’t even know it.” 

CSC: That’s a really unique and cool viewpoint. Usually artists strive to cut the songs they wrote.

TW: “There’s a lot of reasons for that and I was very insecure about that first coming into town. I just realized, for lack of better words, screw it. I’m going to do what I do and I’m just going to be unapologetically the artist I want to be and not be ashamed of that. It’s kind of just taken on a new life of itself now and I love it.” 

CSC: You have a new single out right now with Jordan Fletcher called “I Don’t”. Can you talk about how that collaboration came about?

TW: “It was awesome. It was my first time ever doing a duet. I’ve been wanting to do one for awhile, but we just couldn’t schedule it as there was a lot going on over this last year. A woman I work with in town named Tammi Kidd Hutton works with Jordan; she approached him and asked if he had any songs that a female could cut. He sent over ‘I Don’t’ not even expecting anything and I heard it and I go, ‘oh my gosh I love it. But also would he want to do it with me?’ I think it’s really cool at the end of the day, since he’s a co-writer on the song, to have his input on it the most I can. I always want to pay respect to the writer with whatever song I cut because I want to make them proud. These are their words. He was totally down for the idea and I’m so glad it worked out that way because he has such an intriguing, draw you in voice and I think we meshed together way better than I could have imagined. You always have to go into that thinking, ‘okay you can be two good singers on your own but sometimes not everything always blends.’ So we ended up doing this all together on the same day and it was just like magic. He’s such an amazing artist and talented writer; it was a lot of fun to collaborate with somebody for the first time when it comes to actually singing. It was finding harmonies and all that which was something I’m not used to doing a lot. It really took me out of my element, which I’m really grateful for.”

CSC: We know that you’ve posted that you’re really excited for what’s to come in the future. Can you tell us about your exciting plans?

TW: “Originally, I was going to release one EP followed by singles, which would then hopefully lead to an album down the line or more singles. I’ve realized now that after this year and a half, I want to release another EP, and that’s what we’re working on right now. I’ll be reintroducing myself in a sense — not changing as an artist, I am who I am and my sound is what it is, but elevating it to the next level and showing people where I’ve been the last year and the growth that’s taken within me as an artist. I will always be true to who I am and what I want to say, but just a mature avenue of that. So I’m going to release probably another 4 to 5 songs to piece together where I’ve been and what I’m trying to do, so new fans and listeners can get to know me again. We’re always evolving and I think it’s important that I keep showing people that.” 

CSC: What are your touring plans for the year now that things are getting back to normal?

TF: “I know I’ll be going on the road for more radio tours because that got cut short due to the pandemic. I want to go back and finish the legs of those tours first that I didn’t get to do because country radio has been so gracious towards me throughout all of this and they continue to play my music and support me. I want to make sure I go back out there, play the shows, and visit the people who have been supporting me who I didn’t get to meet during the lockdowns. And then I’m really praying for a booking agent to get on the road to perform and sing. That’s all I really want to do. Now that things are starting to look like there’s light at the end of tunnel, I’m really hoping I’ll be able to do that towards the end of this year.”

CSC: Since we’re Celeb Secrets Country, can you tell us an interesting fact about you that fans wouldn’t know just by hearing your music?

TW: “I don’t know how to ride a bike! I blame my mom and my dad; I don’t know what happened along the way. I went to college in San Francisco and on the weekends, people would ride bikes across the Golden Gate Bridge and I would always have to lie and act like I was so busy and couldn’t do it.” 

CSC: Do you think you’ll try to learn in the future?

TW: I tried once and fell into a rose bush. Before God takes me, I really hope I do learn how to ride a bike because I want to be able to teach my kids one day. And I can’t exactly teach anybody if I don’t know what I’m doing. I’ve had people try to push me but I always chicken out last minute.”

Written by Mariah Crom

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